A cultural-historical approach to teaching geometry

Stuart Rowlands has recently written an article called A Pilot Study of a Cultural-Historical Approach to Teaching Geometry, which was published in Science & Education on Wednesday. Here is the abstract of the article:

There appears to be a widespread assumption that deductive geometry is inappropriate for most learners and that they are incapable of engaging with the abstract and rule-governed intellectual processes that became the world’s first fully developed and comprehensive formalised system of thought. This article discusses a curriculum initiative that aims to ‘bring to life’ the major transformative (primary) events in the history of Greek geometry, aims to encourage a meta-discourse that can develop a reflective consciousness and aims to provide an opportunity for the induction into the formalities of proof and to engage with the abstract. The results of a pilot study to see whether 14–15 year old ‘mixed ability’ and 15–16 year old ‘gifted and talented’ students can be meaningfully engaged with two such transformative events are discussed.